Identification Guide
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Common Names
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Identification Guide
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Introduction
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New Zealand has an estimated 20,000 different fungi species, of which only about 4,000 have been described. Of these, only 600 or so are shown on this website, so don't be surprised if you can not identify the one you have. It helps if you have made a spore print to determine the spore colour to use this quick guide, as the spore colour helps to reduce the number of possibilities!
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Agarics: (Gilled Fungi)
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lineGrowing from the ground or rotting wood, and sometimes from living trees with or without stalks. This is where many fungi are found and where spore prints help to reduce the possibilities.
White spores
Growing from the ground
Genus:leucoagaricus
Genus: leucocoprinus
Genus: Lepiota
Family: Hydnangiaceae
Genus: Amanta
Family: Russulaceae
Genus: Gliophorus
Genus: Humidicutis
Genus: Hygrocybe
Genus: Hygrophorus
Genus: Mycena
Genus: Tricholoma
Family: Tricholomataceae

Growing on wood with stalk
Genus: Armillaria
Family: Marasmiaceae
Genus: Oudemansiella
Family: Pleurotaceae

Growing on wood without stalk
Family: Marasmiaceae
Genus: Crepidotus
Family: Atheliaceae>
Pink spores
Growing from the ground
Family: Agaricaceae
Family: Entolomataceae

Growing from wood
Family: Pluteaceae
Family: Schizophyllaceae       
Brown spores
Growing on the ground
Family: Bolbitiaceae
Family: Cortinariaceae
Genus: Psathyrella
Family: Paxillaceae

Growing on wood
Family: Bolbitiaceae
Family: Strophariaceae
Black spores
Family: Coprinaceae
Family: Strophariaceae
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Agarics: (Spine Fungi)
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lineThese are fungi that have spines rather than the usual gills. Sometimes a magnifying glass is needed to see them. These can be found growing from the ground or rotting wood
Growing on the ground
Family: Auriscalpiaceae
Family: Bankeraceae
Family: Hydnaceae
Growing from wood
Family: Bankeraceae
Family: Coniophoraceae
Family: Exidiaceae
Family: Gomphaceae
Family: Hericiaceae
Family: Steccherinaceae
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Boletes: (Pore Fungi)
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poresThese are fungi which have pores rather than the more common gills, most of which are Mycorrhizal. Therefore, are found under leptospermum and Nothofagus trees or introduced exotics.
Growing on the ground
Family: Boletaceae
Family: Gyroporaceae
Family: Boletinellaceae
Growing from wood
Genus: Favolaschia
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Pouch & Tuberous Fungi:
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Clavogaster novozelandicus With or without a short stalk, with no obvious way to release their spores. Relying instead on being eaten by insects, which then spread the spores in their faeces. Some are brightly coloured, others not so
With a short stalk
Family: Leotiaceae
Family: Strophariaceae
Family: Cortinariaceae
Family: Vibrisseaceae
Family: Discinaceae

Growing on wood
Family: Hypocreaceae
Family: Lasiosphaeriaceae
On or partly buried in ground
Family: Agaricaceae
Family: Boletaceae
Family: Hysterangiaceae
Family: Hydnangiaceae
Family: Pyronemataceae
Family: Rhizopogonaceae
 
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Puffballs, Earthballs & Earthstars Fungi:
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Lycoperdon perlatumThese fungi release their spores ether through a pore at the top or disintegration of the outer wall. Exposing the sponge like interior.
Family: Calostomataceae
Family: Agaricaceae
Family: Sclerodermataceae
Family: Sphaerobolaceae
 
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Stinkhorn's Fungi:
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Aseroe rubraImmature plants look like eggs as they mature. The smell soon indicates where this group gets its name from. Many of which mimic flowers with bright colours.
Family: Phallaceae
 
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Birdsnest Fungi:
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Crucibulum laeveAnother group that is identified by their appearance, that are cup-shaped and appear to contain eggs.
Family: Agaricaceae
 
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Club or Coral Fungi:
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Ramariopsis kunzeiA very difficult group to identify without a microscope and a lot of experience. They are found in a wide variety of colours and shapes, from a simple club to a very branched structure. Growing singly or in small groups or clumps from the ground or less common wood.
Branched
Family: Auriscalpiaceae
Family: Gomphaceae
Genus: Ramaria
Family: Tremellodendropsidaceae
Family: Xylariaceae
Unbranched
Family: Clavariaceae
Family: Clavulinaceae
Family: Gomphaceae

Growing on wood
Family: Xylariaceae
Family: Gomphaceae
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Polypores:
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Stereum fasciatumA thin bracket like or typical mushroom shape growing from wood. Spores are released from pores, which, in most cases, are too small to see.
Family: Steccherinaceae
Family: Stereaceae
Family: Podoscyphaceae
Family: Polyporaceae
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Jelly Fungi:
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Tremella fuciformisSoft jelly like fungi which come in a wide range of colours, from transparent to yellow, orange and red.
Family: Tremellaceae
Family: Auriculariaceae
Family: Exidiaceae
Family: Dacrymycetaceae
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Crust Fungi:
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Chondrostereum purpureumAnother group of fungi that are difficult to identify. It's easy to mistake immature bracket and polypore fungi as belonging to this group.
Family: Phanerochaetaceae
Family: Polyporaceae
Family: Vuilleminiaceae
Family: Stereaceae
Family: Steccherinaceae
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Cup Fungi:
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lineThese come in a wide range of colours, some of which have short stalks. size varies from less than 1 mm to up to 100 mm.
Family: Bulgariaceae
Family: Helotiaceae
Family: Pezizaceae
Family: Pyronemataceae
Family: Sarcoscyphaceae
Family: Sarcosomataceae
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Bracket Fungi:
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Ganoderma applanatumFungi that grow on wood can be hard with pores that are too small to see, or soft and fleshy with gills.
Growing from the ground
Family: Thelephoraceae

Growing from wood with gills
Family: Atheliaceae
Family: Geoglossaceae
Hard and woody with pores
Family: Ganodermataceae
Family: Hymenochaetaceae
Family: Meruliaceae
Family: Xylariaceae
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Fungi on insects:
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Akanthomyces aranearumMany insects are attacked, then eventually killed by fungi. When I see these, I always feel pleased that I am at the top of the food chain.
Family: Clavicipitaceae
Family: Ophiocordycipitaceae
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Hidden Forest
Forest Fungi